Sleep Health Research

Sleep Health Research

Through the sleep health research being conducted by Sleep to Live Institute and sleep industry professionals, advances are being made to ensure you are able to receive your best sleep possible.  Below is a listing of sleep research reports that the sleep experts at the Sleep to Live Institute believe is the most useful and relevant for today’s advances in sleep technology and science. 

We welcome new research and affiliations with leading sleep experts. If you have new sleep research you would like listed on our site, please submit your research and we will contact you within five business days.

By: Andrew D. Krystal, Jack D. Edinger, Gayle S. Bieler, Scott W. Mladsi, and Sean O. Hogan
Choosing a Mattress: Using Actigraphy and Diary Reports to Identify a Mattress That Provides Best Sleep AbstractWe systematically assessed the effects of mattress firmness on sleep, pain, and daytime functioning, finding that mattress firmness has statistically significant effects on both sleep and daytime functioning and that individuals varied widely in the mattress that optimized their sleep. A convenience sample of 128 healthy adults living in the Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, area was...
By: Jason Ensor, BS, R. PSG/EEG T., CNIM1; Rober Oexman, DC1; DAVID SCOTT, BS1; Josh Carrier BS1; Jim Davis, PH.D2
ABSTRACT:STUDY OBJECTIVES:Relatively few studies have evaluated sleeping surface and its effect on overall sleep quality. Those that have done so, typically consider the firmness or softness of a mattress independently of the body type of the individual. In addition, mattresses are typically uniform in their firmness from one side to the other; resulting in compromises from one or both partners in a relationship. This study evaluates the sleep quality of participants that have been profiled,...
By: Gangwisch JE, Malaspina D, Boden-Albala B, Heymsfield SB.
ABSTRACT:STUDY OBJECTIVES:Sleep deprivation has been hypothesized to contribute toward obesity by decreasing leptin, increasing ghrelin, and compromising insulin sensitivity. This study examines cross-sectional and longitudinal data from a large United States sample to determine whether sleep duration is associated with obesity and weight gain.DESIGN:Longitudinal analyses of the 1982-1984, 1987, and 1992 NHANES I Followup Studies and cross-sectional analysis of the 1982-1984 study.SETTING:...